The atomic size of the elements in the periodic table

The periodic table

The atomic size decreases in the periods and increases in the groups .

The atomic radius is used as a measure for the atomic size of the atom , and its measuring unit is picometre ( Pm ) , The picometre is part from million of million part of a metre .

There is a graduation of the atomic size of the elements in the periodic table where the atomic size for the elements of the same period is inversely proportional to the atomic number .

The atomic size decreases in the periods by increasing the atomic number ( from the left to the right )  , due to the increase of the attraction force between the positive nucleus , and the outermost electrons .

The atomic size for the elements of the same group is directly proportional to the atomic number , The atomic size increases in the groups , by increasing the atomic number ( from up to down ) , due to the increase of the number of the energy levels occupied by the electrons .

The nucleus is positively charge as it contains the protons , and the neutral neutrons , In the modern periodic table , You notice that the largest atom of the elements in size is cesium atom , and the smallest one is fluorine .

The graduation of the metallic and nonmetallic property in the modern periodic table

Atoms components , Rutherford and Bohr’s Atomic Models

Evolution concept of the atomic structure , Atomic theory & Properties of cathode rays

Modern periodic table and classification of Elements

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